When it Comes to The Biggest Threat to Your Company, The Data Doesn’t Lie: eDiscovery Best Practices

Cyberattacks certainly make the news in our industry.  But the biggest threat to your company may be within your company in terms of employee misconduct and fraud.  This recent article from Forensic Discovery provides some interesting stats regarding employee misconduct and fraud.

The article The Biggest Threat to Your Company May Be Within Your Company lists ten potential types of employee misconduct and fraud to be concerned about, including the first five here:

  • Misappropriation of trade secrets (as illustrated in this post).
  • Being consistently late to work and/or meetings.
  • Intentional destruction of company hardware and property.
  • Publishing confidential information publicly.
  • Harassing co-workers through messages such as text, email, voicemail, company team collaboration software from company workstation, personal computer or personal cell phone.

The post provides some key stats regarding recent fraud trends and recent sexual harassment trends and discusses the importance of forensic investigation to identify employee misconduct.  It’s clear that, based on the stats (and our own intuition), that employee misconduct and fraud are on the rise and employees looking to hide those activities will take steps to try to conceal their actions.  So, while your organization may be concerned about hackers and cyberattacks, the biggest threat to your company may be within your company.  Don’t forget to protect your organization there as well.

So, what are the rest of the potential types of employee misconduct and fraud to be concerned about?  What are the key stats regarding recent fraud trends and recent sexual harassment trends?  Check out their article here to find out and also to find out what to do about it.

So, what do you think?  Has your organization seen a rise in the need to conduct internal investigations?  Please share any comments you might have or if you’d like to know more about a particular topic.

Disclosure: Forensic Discovery is an Educational Partner and sponsor of eDiscovery Today

Disclaimer: The views represented herein are exclusively the views of the author, and do not necessarily represent the views held by my employer, my partners or my clients. eDiscovery Today is made available solely for educational purposes to provide general information about general eDiscovery principles and not to provide specific legal advice applicable to any particular circumstance. eDiscovery Today should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a lawyer you have retained and who has agreed to represent you.

Leave a Reply