Five eDiscovery Cases You Must Read for 2020: eDiscovery Case Law

It’s that time of year when you look back at “the best of”…well, anything and everything!  Even a year like 2020, which has been challenging (to say the least) for many of us, there are still “best of” items we can take a look back at from the year.  Why should blog topics be any different?

With that in mind, I’ve identified five case rulings (technically, seven or eight opinions) on Ipro’s blog that you need to read which occurred in 2020 – with links to resources about the cases, including eDiscovery Today (of course!) and why you need to know about them.  Are they the “best of” cases for 2020?  You make the call.

Speaking of Ipro and “best of” lists, Ipro has also published the “best of” their terrific “eDiscovery Blues” legal comic strip for the year here.  And, earlier this week, they also identified their top 10 articles of the year here.  I’m honored that two of the articles were written by me and I covered the top article on eDiscovery Today here.  Needless to say, Ipro’s acquisition of NetGovern was one of the most notable acquisitions of the year and reminded us that M&A activity can even happen within a pandemic.

So, what are the five eDiscovery cases you “must read” for 2020?  You can find out on Ipro’s blog here.  Don’t worry, it’s just one extra click!  :o)

Thanks to Ipro and Jim Gill, Content Chief at Ipro, for all the support and for the opportunity to write for your terrific blog this year!  Can’t wait to cover more topics in the Ipro blog next year!

As for important case law of 2020, I’ll have more to cover on that topic soon, with our 2020 year in review EDRM case law webinar coming up in January and another year-in review initiative I expect to have more to report about soon!

So, what do you think?  Which cases do you think are must read for 2020?  Please share any comments you might have or if you’d like to know more about a particular topic.

Disclosure: Ipro is an Educational Partner and sponsor of eDiscovery Today

Disclaimer: The views represented herein are exclusively the views of the authors and speakers themselves, and do not necessarily represent the views held by my employer, my partners or my clients. eDiscovery Today is made available solely for educational purposes to provide general information about general eDiscovery principles and not to provide specific legal advice applicable to any particular circumstance. eDiscovery Today should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a lawyer you have retained and who has agreed to represent you.

Leave a Reply